you are your own obstacle
the fit-spo blog of an ex-bulimic cheerleader.

HEIGHT: 4'11"
HW: 118lbs
CW: 114lbs
LW: 98lbs
UGW: 95lbs
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9 hours ago
143,441 notes - reblog
disneyspixar:

nothing-rhymes-with-grantaire:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

This post is important!
One of my girls at camp had a pain-induced panic attack during lunchtime and if it weren’t for posts like this that I see on Tumblr, I might have done something wrong or not known what to do. But because I’d read posts like these, I was able to keep her calm enough that the camp nurse could get her medication to help her and take over when I had to leave to take care of the rest of my cabin.

wow my bf needs to see this soooo bad

disneyspixar:

nothing-rhymes-with-grantaire:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

This post is important!

One of my girls at camp had a pain-induced panic attack during lunchtime and if it weren’t for posts like this that I see on Tumblr, I might have done something wrong or not known what to do. But because I’d read posts like these, I was able to keep her calm enough that the camp nurse could get her medication to help her and take over when I had to leave to take care of the rest of my cabin.

wow my bf needs to see this soooo bad

1 day ago
845 notes - reblog
2 days ago
1,846 notes - reblog
2 days ago
33 notes - reblog
therainssmallhands:

One peach, some frozen strawberries, a handful of flaxseed and milk makes fresh ice cream.

therainssmallhands:

One peach, some frozen strawberries, a handful of flaxseed and milk makes fresh ice cream.

1 week ago
138,414 notes - reblog
1 week ago
510,351 notes - reblog

notsocolourblind:

hello-imaliveandwandwell:

hiroshimalated:

Please keep this circulating. Cops are getting more and more brazen, know your rights!

good to know

Reblogging every time this goes past

1 week ago
9 notes - reblog
Bachelor Party Games

ravenrennea:

- Search & Destroy: Money is hidden in Bachelor’s clothes. (“Hide them everywhere, be creative!”) Intro Lap Dance, one from each girl. Money is removed.

- Spanking: Bachelor is moved to the floor, flipped over and pants are pulled down. Rip boxers and spray shaving cream on his ass. (“The More…

1 week ago
1,638 notes - reblog
Why I will NEVER fuck with strippers who sleep with men from the club.

ravenrennea:

mmmmilk:

stripper-sass:

Some idiot from Return of Kings.com has decided to post this absolute atrocity - five steps towards fucking a stripper. It’s exactly as you would imagine it; full of  idiotic tips such as “Don’t spend money”, “Tap into her daddy issues” and “Befriend the bouncers”.

To any fellas reading this, let me just say that every single one of these pathetic methods has been tried on me before. Like, a lot of times. Every ~trick in that book has been tried on me, and then some. Do you know what I do, whenever anyone from the club expects me to fuck them? I laugh in their face. Loudly. Uproariously.

A week ago, a beautiful nineteen year old Kiwi boy tried all of these moves, and then tried to pull me close and ask me to go home with him.

I laughed in his face.

Last night, a business executive offered me seven thousand dollars to go back to his place for the evening and ‘just dance’ for him.

I laughed in his face.

Last month, a guy tried the trick mentioned in this article’s comment section - he sat front row, refused to tip me, told me with a sardonic smile (an attempt at being alpha, I assume) that I should ‘try someone else sweetheart, maybe we’ll hang later.’

I laughed in his face and got him physically thrown out of the club.

LADIES, LADIES, LADIES. Please remember who is in charge of the club, and that is YOU, that is US. We create our own boundaries, we decide what is and is not okay regarding communication and how we are spoken to, and what is NOT okay is freeloading fucking pervert morons assuming that we want to fulfil their piss-poor, boring stripper fantasies.

Repeat after me, please:

  • I am not a commodity.
  • I am not only a stripper.
  • I did not get into this industry to cater to the fantasies of boring, pathetic little men who think they can assert dominance over me because of what I do.
  • Men who come into the club looking to pick up are disgusting.
  • I will do better by my industry than that.
  • I will do better by myself than that.
  • I will do better by my coworkers than that.
  • Taking my clothes off for money does not mean I lack self respect - playing into the hands of disgusting men who do not view me as a human being, on the other hand, does.
  • I will fuck people who are attracted to ME, not the person I am at the club/the idea of fucking a stripper.
  • Pick up artists must die.

Got it?

"Aw, that’s adorable.. you think I’m a prostitute!"

PREACH!!!

(Source: )

1 week ago
796 notes - reblog
2 weeks ago
919 notes - reblog
confectionerybliss:

Herbal Tea Lemonade a Starbucks Knockoff | Whipperberry
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